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OFF THE BEATEN TRACK | PART 1

Not without reason, Perthshire is known as the “big county”; covering an area in excess of 2,500 square miles, it offers a variety of landscape, from the rich agricultural straths in the east, to the high mountains of the southern Highlands. Despite the size and variety of the landscape, it is very easy to find one’s self returning to photograph the same popular locations; in this post I am featuring a few of my favourite images from just slightly off the well-beaten tourist trails.

morning | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

morning | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

Craiglush is one of a series of small lochs to the east of Dunkeld and is a designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Starting off early one morning I arrived in time to capture the tranquility of this scene but literally within minutes a breeze had arisen to destroy the beautiful reflections and the calmness of the spindly reeds.
4 sec @ f/16  ISO 100  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

broken reed | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

broken reed | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

This is a simple composition, featuring a broken reed rising above the watery highlights and shadows; the crooked reflection streaking from the base of the reed is essential to the understanding of this image.
1/800 sec @ f/2.8  ISO 1600  Nikon D800 with 70-200mm f/2.8 lens @ 200mm

 

woodland | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

woodland | Loch of Craiglush | Perthshire

I found this forestry track winding its way into the interior of dense woodland; here there was enough sunlight filtering through from the left-hand side to bring a bank of brown-tinted bracken to life. The subdued colours of autumn are truly wonderful.
0.8 sec @ f/16  ISO 100  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

Braan Gorge | Perthshire

Braan Gorge | Perthshire

Ok, perhaps not so far off the beaten track here but I definitely had a scramble down to this rocky ledge; with a view to the old stone bridge crossing the Braan River gorge close to the Hermitage visitor attraction. The autumn colours and reflections were at their peak with the foreground and background linked by the glass-like, peaty dark tones of the River Braan.
10 sec @ f/16  ISO 100  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

dead tree | Monzie | Perthshire

dead tree | Monzie | Perthshire

I spotted this “wow” tree while driving along a back road a few miles to the north of Crieff and knew immediately that I had to get a photograph; no crowning glory of autumn foliage for this huge, dead tree with its antler-like branches! This and the following image have been captured on a camera converted specially for Infrared photography. The great point about IR is that no filters are required whatsoever to bring down light levels in the sky; although the day was overcast, considerable filtration would have been required in a “normal” colour or monochrome exposure.
1/500 sec @ f/5.6  ISO 100  Nikon D3 with 70-200mm f/2.8 lens @ 70mm

 

dead tree | Monzie | Perthshire

dead tree | Monzie | Perthshire

Infrared capture really adds to the “spooky” appearance and in the texture of the dead tree; it also helps to isolate the tree from the background of healthy woodland.
1/500 sec @ f/5.6  ISO 100  Nikon D3 with 70-200mm f/2.8 lens @ 130mm

 

autumn | Benny Beg | Perthshire

autumn | Benny Beg | Perthshire

At Benny Beg near Crieff there is an unusual ridge-back frequented as a training area by rock climbers; atop of the ridge is a sort of plateau covered with clumps of ancient trees, as seen here. Not a strong composition but I like the barely seen foot path as it falls away on the right before climbing past the central tree with its glorious tints.
4 sec @ f/16  ISO 100  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

fallen leaves | Benny Beg | Perthshire

fallen leaves | Benny Beg | Perthshire

At the base of the ridge “wall” is a tree with well exposed roots; at this time the roots were partly covered by a blanket of fallen leaves. I love the way Infrared has effectively differentiated the rough textures of bark and rock while lightening the tones of the fallen leaves.
1/3 sec @ f/16  ISO 200  Nikon D3 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

  • tom - Love the Rumbling Bridge image. The slow moving water is delightful. TP16/11/2015 – 10:27 amReplyCancel

    • admin - Thanks Tom, even a 10 second exposure time can be pretty effective!16/11/2015 – 4:31 pmReplyCancel

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