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ALDEBURGH TO LOCH MORLICH

The following images encompass (what in the USA might be called a road trip) beginning on a beach in Suffolk then on to Malhamdale in North Yorkshire before finishing on the shore of Loch Morlich in the Highlands of Scotland.

The Scallop | Aldeburgh Beach | Suffolk

The Scallop | Aldeburgh Beach | Suffolk

“The Scallop” at Aldeburgh seafront in Suffolk is dedicated to the composer Benjamin Britten, who used to walk along this beach. Created from stainless steel, it stands four metres high and comprises two interlocking scallop shells, the upright shell being pierced with the words: “I hear those voices that will not be drowned”, taken from Britten’s opera “Peter Grimes”.
125 ISO  1/1000 sec @ f/2.5  Canon IXUS 115HS

 

main door | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

main door | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

The ornate doorway to St. Mary’s church in the lovely village of Woolpit, Suffolk; I couldn’t resist giving a nod to the old wedding photography fad of “spot-colouring” the flowers in the pots, letting the rest of the image go to monochrome. The tilt + shift lens was shifted to maintain correct perspective.
100 ISO  1/20 sec @ f/16  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

side door | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

side door | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

A side door at St. Mary’s church, Woolpit; perhaps reserved for use by the less well-to-do in society in less democratic times? As a photographer, I was more attracted to this doorway with its cracked masonry, exposed stonework and rustic arch than the elaborate main entrance.
100 ISO  1 sec @ f/16  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

overgrown dyke | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

overgrown dyke | Woolpit Church | Suffolk

I’m drawn to subjects where nature fuses with man-made objects; here the creeping foliage is about to overpower the stone and brick wall of Woolpit churchyard. The passing Vicar confidently assured me that the encroaching growth would shortly be ripped away; however, I predict that nature will return soon enough!
100 ISO  1/5 sec @ f/16  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

Malhamdale | N. Yorkshire

Malhamdale | N. Yorkshire

By the foot of Malham Cove in North Yorkshire; the diagonal of the stone bridge leads the eye over the gentle stream, through the open gate to the pasture beyond. The composition would not have worked with a closed gate; however a passing Hong Kong tourist very kindly offered to crouch behind the dyke and hold open the spring-loaded gate.
100 ISO  15 sec @ f/13  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

limestone pavement |Maham Cove | N. Yorkshire

limestone pavement | Maham Cove | N. Yorkshire

Part of the famous limestone-pavement above Malham Cove; the “pavement” itself can be very dangerous in wet conditions when the rock becomes as slippery as ice. This day was dry albeit heavily overcast but with the benefit of a tiny patch of sunlight hitting the fields in the middle distance, this helped to give the image a certain depth.
100 ISO  1/10 sec @ f/11  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

Janets Foss | Malham | N. Yorkshire

Janets Foss | Malham | N. Yorkshire

Janet’s Foss is a small waterfall near the village of Malham, North Yorkshire carrying the Gordale Beck over a limestone outcrop into a deep pool below. The name Janet is thought to be a folk tale reference to a fairy queen believed to inhabit a cave at the rear of the waterfall; while Foss is a Nordic word for waterfall. It’s a magical place and I’ve tried to bring this out in the post-processing seen here.
100 ISO  2 sec @ f/11  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

Janets Foss | Malham | N. Yorkshire

Janets Foss | Malham | N. Yorkshire

Another version of Janet’s Foss, this time captured on a zoom lens and at a longer exposure to highlight the rough texture of the rock juxtaposed with the silky flow of the waterfall. The cool-toned monochrome works well and is an indicator of the temperature of the water for those who dare to dip!
100 ISO  62 sec @ f/13  Nikon D800 with 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm

 

waterfall in stream | Malham | N. Yorkshire

waterfall in stream | Malham | N. Yorkshire

I cannot resist photographing waterfalls, large or small; in this case small as it was only 3 feet wide. I love the comb-like effect on the right-hand side, also the autumn-coloured leaves stuck in limbo atop the waterfall. This was another opportunity for my wife, Margaret, to sit and read her Kindle while I fussed around over composition and exposure.
100 ISO  13 sec @ f/13  Nikon D800 with 45mm f/2.8 Tilt + Shift lens

 

morning | Loch Morlich | Inverness-shire

morning | Loch Morlich | Inverness-shire

For some time past I had been on a mission to capture an image of Loch Morlich, which lies at the foot of the Cairngorms; my daughter, Kirsteen and her future husband, Martyn, became engaged by the side of the Loch a few years back and wanted a framed picture of their special place. The weather was favourable on this occasion, however, I stupidly arrived a bit late only to find the morning mist and sunbeams quickly evaporating as the sun climbed higher in the sky. Also the increasing breeze were eroding the beautiful reflections in the water. I sulked for the rest of the day at what might have been; however, I am rather pleased with what I achieved here. This large wall canvas now hangs proudly in my daughter’s home and looks fantastic.
100 ISO  1/8 sec @ f/14  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

evening | Loch Morlich | Inverness-shire

evening | Loch Morlich | Inverness-shire

Having seemingly failed to achieve what I had hoped for in the morning, I  had a second bite of the apple with this wonderful evening shot of Loch Morlich; created by stitching together 3 – thirty second long exposures to produce a finished 34 x 13″ panorama ready for mounting and framing. Success at last!
100 ISO  30 sec @ f/14  Nikon D800 with 24mm f/3.5 Tilt + Shift lens

 

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